print

Purpose

Prints matrices, arrays, strings and string arrays to the screen and/or auxiliary output.

Format

print list_of_expressions;
print [[/typ]] [[/fmted]] [[/mf]] [[/jnt]] list_of_expressions[[;]];

Parameters

list_of_expressions:
 

(any) GAUSS expressions that produce matrices, arrays, stings, or string arrays and/or names of variables to print, separated by spaces.

/typ:

(literal) symbol type flag.

/mat, /sa, /str Indicate which symbol types you are setting the output format for: matrices and arrays (/mat), string arrays (/sa), and/or strings (/str). You can specify more than one / typ flag; the format will be set for all types indicated. If no / typ flag is listed, print assumes /mat.
/fmted:

(literal) enable formatting flag.

/on, /off Enable/disable formatting. When formatting is disabled, the contents of a variable are dumped to the screen in a “raw” format. /off is currently supported only for strings. “Raw” format for strings means that the entire string is printed, starting at the current cursor position. When formatting is enabled for strings, they are handled the same as string arrays. This shouldn’t be too surprising, since a string is actually a 1x1 string array.
/mf:

(literal) matrix format. It controls the way rows of a matrix are separated from one another. The possibilities are:

/m0 no delimiters before or after rows when printing out matrices.
/m1 or /mb1 print 1 carriage return/line feed pair before each row of a matrix with more than 1 row.
/m2 or /mb2 print 2 carriage return/line feed pairs before each row of a matrix with more than 1 row.
/m3 or /mb3 print “Row 1”, “Row 2”… before each row of a matrix with more than one row.
/ma1 print 1 carriage return/line feed pair after each row of a matrix with more than 1 row.
/ma2 print 2 carriage return/line feed pairs after each row of a matrix with more than 1 row.
/a1 print 1 carriage return/line feed pair after each row of a matrix.
/a2 print 2 carriage return/line feed pairs after each row of a matrix.
/b1 print 1 carriage return/line feed pair before each row of a matrix.
/b2 print 2 carriage return/line feed pairs before each row of a matrix.
/b3 print “Row 1”, “Row 2”… before each row of a matrix.
/jnt:

(literal) controls justification, notation, and the trailing character.

Right-Justified

/rd Signed decimal number in the form [[-]]####.####, where #### is one or more decimal digits. The number of digits before the decimal point depends on the magnitude of the number, and the number of digits after the decimal point depends on the precision. If the precision is 0, no decimal point will be printed.
/re Signed number in the form [[-]]#.##E±###, where # is one decimal digit, ## is one or more decimal digits depending on the precision, and ### is three decimal digits. If precision is 0, the form will be [[-]]#E±### with no decimal point printed.
/ro This will give a format like /rd or /re depending on which is most compact for the number being printed. A format like /re will be used only if the exponent value is less than -4 or greater than the precision. If a /re format is used, a decimal point will always appear. The precision signifies the number of significant digits displayed.
/rz This will give a format like /rd or /re depending on which is most compact for the number being printed. A format like /re will be used only if the exponent value is less than -4 or greater than the precision. If a /re format is used, trailing zeros will be supressed and a decimal point will appear only if one or more digits follow it. The precision signifies the number of significant digits displayed.

Left-Justified

/ld Signed decimal number in the form [[-]] ####.####, where #### is one or more decimal digits. The number of digits before the decimal point depends on the magnitude of the number, and the number of digits after the decimal point depends on the precision. If the precision is 0, no decimal point will be printed. If the number is positive, a space character will replace the leading minus sign.
/le Signed number in the form [[-]]#.##E±###, where # is one decimal digit, ## is one or more decimal digits depending on the precision, and ### is three decimal digits. If precision is 0, the form will be [[-]]#E±### with no decimal point printed. If the number is positive, a space character will replace the leading minus sign.
/lo This will give a format like /ld or /le depending on which is most compact for the number being printed. A format like /le will be used only if the exponent value is less than -4 or greater than the precision. If a /le format is used, a decimal point will always appear. If the number is positive, a space character will replace the leading minus sign. The precision specifies the number of significant digits displayed.
/lz This will give a format like /ld or /le depending on which is most compact for the number being printed. A format like /le will be used only if the exponent value is less than -4 or greater than the precision. If a /le format is used, trailing zeros will be supressed and a decimal point will appear only if one or more digits follow it. If the number is positive, a space character will replace the leading minus sign. The precision specifies the number of significant digits displayed.

Trailing Character

The following characters can be added to the /jnt parameters above to control the trailing character if any:

format /rdn 1,3;
s The number will be followed immediately by a space character. This is the default.
c The number will be followed immediately by a comma.
t The number will be followed immediately by a tab character.
n

No trailing character.

The default when GAUSS is first started is:

format /m1 /ro 16,8;
;; Double semicolons following a print statement will suppress the final carriage return/line feed.

Examples

Example 3

x = rndn(3, 3);
format /rd 16,8;
print x;

returns:

 0.14357994  -1.39272762  -0.91942414
 0.51061645  -0.02332207  -0.02511298
-1.04675893  -1.04988540   0.07992059

Scientific notation

format /re 12,2;
print x;

returns:

 1.44E-001  -1.39E+000  -9.19E-001
 5.11E-001  -2.33E-002  -2.51E-002
-1.55E+000  -1.05E+000   7.99E-002

Append commas

x = rndn(3, 3);
format /rd 16,8;
print x;

returns:

 0.14357994,  -1.39272762,  -0.91942414,
 0.51061645,  -0.02332207,  -0.02511298,
-1.04675893,  -1.04988540,   0.07992059,

Add row numbers

print /rd /m3 x;

returns:

Row 1
      0.14       -1.39       -0.92
Row 2
      0.51       -0.02       -0.03
Row 3
     -1.55       -1.05        0.08

Note

This example does not specify the precision and spacing, so you may see more decimal places printed if that is your default setting

Printing character data

Character data is text inside a GAUSS matrix. To print elements of a matrix as characters, you need to prepend the dollar sign ($) to the name of the variable you want to print. In most cases, string arrays are recommended over character matrices..

x = { AGE, PAY, SEX };
format /m1 8,8;
print $x;
AGE
PAY
SEX

Remarks

The list of expressions MUST be separated by spaces. In print statements, because a space is the delimiter between expressions, NO SPACES are allowed inside expressions unless they are within index brackets, quotes, or parentheses.

The printing of special characters is accomplished by the use of the backslash (\\) within double quotes. The options are:

\b backspace (ASCII 8)
\e escape (ASCII 27)
\f form feed (ASCII 12)
\g beep (ASCII 7)
\l line feed (ASCII 10)
\r carriage return (ASCII 13)
\t tab (ASCII 9)
\### the character whose ASCII value is “###” (decimal).

Thus, \13\10 is a carriage return/line feed sequence. The first three digits will be picked up here. So if the character to follow a special character is a digit, be sure to use three digits in the escape sequence. For example: \0074 will be interpreted as 2 characters (ASCII 7, “4”)

An expression with no assignment operator is an implicit print statement.

If output on has been specified, then all subsequent print statements will be directed to the auxiliary output as well as the window. (See output.) The locate statement has no effect on what will be sent to the auxiliary output, so all formatting must be accomplished using tab characters or some other form of serial output.

If the name of the symbol to be printed is prefixed with a $, it is assumed that the symbol is a matrix of characters.

print $x;

Note that GAUSS makes no distinction between matrices containing character data and those containing numeric data, so it is the responsibility of the user to use functions which operate on character matrices only on those matrices containing character data.

These matrices of character strings have a maximum of 8 characters per element. A precision of 8 or more should be set when printing out character matrices or the elements will be truncated.

Complex numbers are printed with the sign of the imaginary half separating them and an “i” appended to the imaginary half. Also, the current field width setting (see format(keyword)) refers to the width of field for each half of the number, so a complex number printed with a field of 8 will actually take (at least) 20 spaces to print.

print’ing a sparse matrix results in a table of the non-zero values contained in the sparse matrix, followed by their corresponding row and column indices, respectively.

A print statement by itself will cause a blank line to be printed:

print;

See also

Functions printfm(), printdos